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How Social Media Can End Distracted Driving

How Social Media Can End Distracted Driving
[lead]Social media on the road is ill-advised and dangerous. As a digital-first marketing agency, we’d like to be bold in saying that social posting should have limits… starting with eliminating distracted driving.[/lead]
April is “Distracted Driving Awareness” Month.

What is distracted driving? Anything that takes your:

  1. Eyes off the wheel
  2. Hands off the wheel
  3. Mind off the wheel

In the social media world, we are seeing an increase of people making stupid decisions while driving. Not only are people texting while operating a motor vehicle, but now they are posting, snapping, and live streaming.

As people become more active on social media in their daily lives, we are also seeing a rise in accidents, injuries, and deaths due to distracted driving. This trend is alarming, disturbing, and has to stop. 

This month on TheShow.Live, we’ve utilized two shows to bring awareness to distracted driving. Our goal is to generate a conversation that not only continues on social media, but moves into the lives and homes of our audience. The more we talk about the serious impact a mindless phone-check can have on a life, the more we can generate buzz and create a change. 

If talking about distracted driving stops one person from driving while posting (in any form), we’ve saved a life.

Monday, we talked with Officer Mike Bieres and Sergeant Marc Marty from lawenforcement.social. These officers took to social media to connect with their communities and educate people on public safety topics ranging from cyberbullying to distracted driving.

We had a great discussion, but one comment from Officer Bieres stood out:

“A motor vehicle can kill someone faster than a gun.”

It’s startling, but true.

Make a commitment today to be part of the effort to end distracted driving. Don’t drive while texting, Snapchatting, Facebook posting, tweeting, Periscoping, etc., and when you see others drive while distracted, call them out. Tell them they are a danger to themselves and others.

Find more ideas on how to end distracted driving at EndDD.org.

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